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PHILLIP BLOCK PORTFOLIO

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This is a typeface I designed for brief about "future" technology that exists now, and futuristic technology and ideas. Tasked with picking an exhibit/project from the V&A's The future is here and now exhibition, I chose Cubesat. Cubesat is a type of open source satellite specification, with the aim of allowing anybody to perform their own space missions and research. Cubesats are tiny (for a satellite), efficient and densely packed, with a multitude of different options for what goes inside.

I created a mono-spaced typeface with thick, heavy, dense letterforms, and a definite retro-futuristic style, with at least 3 alternates for each letter to reflect the flexibility of the Cubesat units.

Featured on type foundry Fontsmith's blog here.


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For this brief, I had to create a design company brochure for the inspirational designer, Fanette Mellier, using the medium to try and represent the tone of her work.

Naturally it made sense to design something brightly colourful, tactile and playful.

As you pull the leaflets out of the envelopes, the artwork slides past the lasercut windows.

Depending which way you fold and put back the leaflets, different beautiful pieces of design will be shown through the windows and become part of the packaging.

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Star Strike is a 2 player strategy board game I designed for the 2018 D&AD Hasbro brief. I wanted to make something that reflects the sci-fi themes and artwork that have always inspired me, and that had space for strategy and tense situations while remaining a fairly quick game, 5-15 minutes.

The board that the game takes place on is made up of individual acrylic tiles, with different illustrations of planets, asteroid fields, space stations and nebulae. I chose a visual style and colour palette that highlighted how colourful and vibrant space can be.

From planets, players can pick up technology cards, with varying levels of game impact, with some causing tiles to be removed from the board.

Players keep a divider up in front of them, with different cockpit illustrations inside - these hide the location of your spaceship, a small 3D printed rocket ship, which is represented on a smaller version of the playing grid.

The players hop around the planets and space stations, scanning tiles to try and hunt each other down. Acrylic markers are used to keep track of where you think your opponent is hiding. You only have 3 lives, but you must be in the same row or column as your opponent before you can take your shot, opening up a vulnerability if you don't have many moves left.

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Inherent Vice is one of my favourite books. Written by Thomas Pynchon, you follow private investigator/hippy Doc Sportello as you stumble through a conspiracy to do with kidnap, california real estate, dope smuggling and nazi bikers in 1970 L.A.

My jacket for this book features an illustration which you light up by opening the front cover, revealing the pack of Kools with the books title printed on.

Neon colours on a swallowing darkness.

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For this project I was tasked with branding the Birmingham Design Festival. Specifically, the years theme of "Forward". My concept was to use distorted ripples, as if carving forward through water, leaving a wake behind.

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For branding a local fishmongers I designed a series of illustrated patterns of fish & crustacean, creating beautiful translucent wrapping paper for the produce.

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I've made a number of illustrated gig posters for gigs I've either been to or wanted to go to, mostly personal projects.

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For the RSA's 2019 student awards, I chose the Living and Dying Well brief, creating an animation for the Michael Buerk audio on the subject of preparing for fatal illness. The challenge here being to make an accompanying animation that is able to lighten the subject a little while still conveying its importance.

My preferred medium for illustrative pieces is pen & paper, and I love traditional hand-drawn animation, so I set out to hand draw every frame. Mostly using a method of 15-30 frame sequences and loops, and then assembling it all on after effects, I drew over 600 frames on A5 sheets. Below are gifs of the original frame scans.